all’s well that fucking ends at some point

Everyone is in love with the wrong person lately. It’s a Situation Tragedy, in which the same people end up dead on the floor at the end of each episode, stiffening and cooling as the laugh track roars on and on.

I remember experiments done with baby primates who had been separated from their mothers. They were given wire frame mothers to hug. The little primates preferred the wire frame mothers that had terry cloth on them so they were a bit softer. I think I’m going to go to the Sav-On and see if they have any of those.

Preferably with the cloth, you know, but one can’t be so picky these days.

We’re an unhappy bunch a lot of the time, but I wouldn’t trade these friends for any others. We fall in and out of love with each other, or crash our cars into each other, or accidentally eat each others’ lunches, but we can still talk about it reasonably most of the time and get somewhere that we can all live.

I want to freeze this moment and work on it, fix it, make things better, but all the time I’m trying to figure things out I’m getting older and my life is oozing away.

5 thoughts on “all’s well that fucking ends at some point

  1. I recall reading something ages ago pointing out that people who live in urban environments tend to exhibit all the same neuroses as animals living in zoos.
    On an unrelated note, I would pay good money to see just one episode of Friends end with everyone dead and stiffening. I think you may be on to something here.

  2. Actually, that is not an accident that I always eat your lunch….I do it on purpose…and its your fault for using your yummy home made bread in your lunch….

  3. right, and the other option they gave to the baby monkeys was a wire ‘mother’ without the terry cloth but with a bottle of formula or whatever–some kind of nourishment, anyway. and the babies would nearly always go to the soft, comforting ‘mother’ rather than the one who would feed them. the end result was that emotional sustenance can be considered just as important as, if not more so than, physical sustenance. that study is why they have programs where people go to the hospital and cuddle crack babies and things like that, and help those babies grow up to be healthy.
    (something interesting, though: a serious drawback of harlow’s whole study was that once those baby monkeys got older, their behavior was bizarre and violent, and when they reached maturity they had problems mating. those that did actually have babies treated them very coldly and didn’t know how to take care of them. i think that’s because he picked monkeys that actually did have mothers, separated them, and raised them in the cages. that kind of thing was okay in the 50s-60s, but would be considered animal cruelty today, i think. i apologize for rambling about this, but this is one of those times that someone brings something up and i’m excited to have opportunity to talk about it because i think it’s so interesting.)

  4. i recall reading about the rhesus monkeys and the results from them only having the pseudo-mothers. and i also remember the things that happened, which were mentioned in the comment before mine: the violence, antisocial behavior, and general societal disruption that was caused by not having a mother figure.

  5. I think I’m the character on a trapeze, swinging above the stage, throwing cheese down on the actors and shouting “GUYS? GUYS? WAKE UP! THIS ISN’T FUNNY ANY MORE!”
    I take it all very lightly on the surface, but underneath it all, I feel very heavy. So I just shuddup.

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