12 responses to “Delicious LiveJournal Links for 12-24-2008”

  1. pauldeman2pt0

    Soy is feminizing, and commonly leads to a decrease in the size of the penis, sexual confusion and homosexuality. That’s why most of the medical (not socio-spiritual) blame for today’s rise in homosexuality must fall upon the rise in soy formula and other soy products. (Most babies are bottle-fed during some part of their infancy, and one-fourth of them are getting soy milk!) Homosexuals often argue that their homosexuality is inborn because “I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t homosexual.” No, homosexuality is always deviant. But now many of them can truthfully say that they can’t remember a time when excess estrogen wasn’t influencing them.

    Yes: because “gay” always automatically equals GAY MALE. Also, all gay people who have ever existed, oh, SINCE THE BEGINNING OF MANKIND, had access to and consumed as much soy as health nuts do nowadays, which explains why gay people have always existed. Also: gay women—hypothetically there should be fewer of them now—all that estrogen is “feminizing” after all! Also, yes: it’s really just as simple as “gay men = effeminate men,” and that gay people are merely “gender-reversed” (i.e. – gay men “feminine” and gay women “masculine”); because that line of thought isn’t itself based on an inherently heterosexual and artificially-conceived gender binary, either.

    Sorry…the stupid set me off.

    1. Anonymous

      Gay men? Well that’s a deviant abomination caused by the DEVIL soy. Them ancient Greeks? Why, I’m sure they had access to soy — isn’t “phytoestrogen” one of them wacky gook Greek words?

      Gay women? Well that’s just foreplay on the good ol’ red-blooded porno, and I’m sure that once a big red blooded blonde-haired blue-eyed ‘MURRICAN man comes from his hardworking AMERICAN job he’ll set both of those sassy ladies straight! All while JEEZUS watches.

      Didn’t you get the memo?

    2. Anonymous

      Gay men? Well that’s a deviant abomination caused by the DEVIL soy. Them ancient Greeks? Why, I’m sure they had access to soy — isn’t “phytoestrogen” one of them wacky gook Greek words?

      Gay women? Well that’s just foreplay on the good ol’ red-blooded porno, and I’m sure that once a big red blooded blonde-haired blue-eyed ‘MURRICAN man comes from his hardworking AMERICAN job he’ll set both of those sassy ladies straight! All while JEEZUS watches.

      Didn’t you get the memo?

  2. pauldeman2pt0

    Soy is feminizing, and commonly leads to a decrease in the size of the penis, sexual confusion and homosexuality. That’s why most of the medical (not socio-spiritual) blame for today’s rise in homosexuality must fall upon the rise in soy formula and other soy products. (Most babies are bottle-fed during some part of their infancy, and one-fourth of them are getting soy milk!) Homosexuals often argue that their homosexuality is inborn because “I can’t remember a time when I wasn’t homosexual.” No, homosexuality is always deviant. But now many of them can truthfully say that they can’t remember a time when excess estrogen wasn’t influencing them.

    Yes: because “gay” always automatically equals GAY MALE. Also, all gay people who have ever existed, oh, SINCE THE BEGINNING OF MANKIND, had access to and consumed as much soy as health nuts do nowadays, which explains why gay people have always existed. Also: gay women—hypothetically there should be fewer of them now—all that estrogen is “feminizing” after all! Also, yes: it’s really just as simple as “gay men = effeminate men,” and that gay people are merely “gender-reversed” (i.e. – gay men “feminine” and gay women “masculine”); because that line of thought isn’t itself based on an inherently heterosexual and artificially-conceived gender binary, either.

    Sorry…the stupid set me off.

  3. eris_devotee

    While he’s an idiot, soy does contain enough estrogen to be bad news for people with autoimmune disorders. I’m not allowed to eat soy – it triggers flares.

    1. Anonymous

      Sort of an interesting addendum to this: my mother, who has a whole slew of autoimmune disorders (systemic lupus, hashimoto/hypothyroid, and sjogren’s), while never being much of a soy person, DOES take a little bit of black cohosh and other foods that contain copious phytoestrogens. These foods/herbs are usually taken to ease the symptoms of menopause; she is nowhere near menopause, mind you. For whatever reason, the supplements seem to REDUCE the intensity and frequency of flares (so much that her doctor is actually looking into the combination she is using).

      Hormones are of course, a very double-edged sword (like any tool, such as fire, or … well, swords) and can have different effects based on the context, quantity etc. But, for what it’s worth, there’s clearly SOME sort of impact from phytoestrogns on autoimmune disorders, and it’s interesting to track it.

      1. eris_devotee

        I have systemic lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, and even before I was told by a doc not to eat soy – if I eat soy, and then go into the sun, I get the discoid rash *really badly* (much worse than if I hadn’t eaten soy).

        Also – research has shown (in mice) that diets high in soy made lupus much worse. Sprouts are also a no-no.

        In addition, the best course of action (when it comes to food) is to limit intake.

        I stay completely on top of modern research when it comes to lupus/et al. I do this mostly because I do not have health insurance, and so I get treated by docs-in-training… and it’s best if I come into appointments armed with medical journals.

        If it’s working for your mom – that’s great. But at this point, I would consider it anecdotal and possibly a positive-placebo effect… especially considering my own experience and the research I’ve stumbled across.

        1. Anonymous


          In addition, the best course of action (when it comes to food) is to limit intake.

          That is the first thing she was told as well; it seems to be the largest determinant of success.


          I stay completely on top of modern research when it comes to lupus/et al. I do this mostly because I do not have health insurance, and so I get treated by docs-in-training… and it’s best if I come into appointments armed with medical journals.

          It’s a worrisome state of affairs that I have to agree with that tactic, even for people with health insurance.


          If it’s working for your mom – that’s great. But at this point, I would consider it anecdotal and possibly a positive-placebo effect… especially considering my own experience and the research I’ve stumbled across.

          The effects of the cohosh &c. may actually be negatively impacting the lupus but may be positively impacting the sjogren’s, or what have you. The problem with multiple and related diseases is that it’s relatively difficult to isolate what is effecting what. My rule of thumb is, if it shuts her up, it’s a good treatment :-)

        2. Anonymous


          In addition, the best course of action (when it comes to food) is to limit intake.

          That is the first thing she was told as well; it seems to be the largest determinant of success.


          I stay completely on top of modern research when it comes to lupus/et al. I do this mostly because I do not have health insurance, and so I get treated by docs-in-training… and it’s best if I come into appointments armed with medical journals.

          It’s a worrisome state of affairs that I have to agree with that tactic, even for people with health insurance.


          If it’s working for your mom – that’s great. But at this point, I would consider it anecdotal and possibly a positive-placebo effect… especially considering my own experience and the research I’ve stumbled across.

          The effects of the cohosh &c. may actually be negatively impacting the lupus but may be positively impacting the sjogren’s, or what have you. The problem with multiple and related diseases is that it’s relatively difficult to isolate what is effecting what. My rule of thumb is, if it shuts her up, it’s a good treatment :-)

      2. eris_devotee

        I have systemic lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, and even before I was told by a doc not to eat soy – if I eat soy, and then go into the sun, I get the discoid rash *really badly* (much worse than if I hadn’t eaten soy).

        Also – research has shown (in mice) that diets high in soy made lupus much worse. Sprouts are also a no-no.

        In addition, the best course of action (when it comes to food) is to limit intake.

        I stay completely on top of modern research when it comes to lupus/et al. I do this mostly because I do not have health insurance, and so I get treated by docs-in-training… and it’s best if I come into appointments armed with medical journals.

        If it’s working for your mom – that’s great. But at this point, I would consider it anecdotal and possibly a positive-placebo effect… especially considering my own experience and the research I’ve stumbled across.

    2. Anonymous

      Sort of an interesting addendum to this: my mother, who has a whole slew of autoimmune disorders (systemic lupus, hashimoto/hypothyroid, and sjogren’s), while never being much of a soy person, DOES take a little bit of black cohosh and other foods that contain copious phytoestrogens. These foods/herbs are usually taken to ease the symptoms of menopause; she is nowhere near menopause, mind you. For whatever reason, the supplements seem to REDUCE the intensity and frequency of flares (so much that her doctor is actually looking into the combination she is using).

      Hormones are of course, a very double-edged sword (like any tool, such as fire, or … well, swords) and can have different effects based on the context, quantity etc. But, for what it’s worth, there’s clearly SOME sort of impact from phytoestrogns on autoimmune disorders, and it’s interesting to track it.

  4. eris_devotee

    While he’s an idiot, soy does contain enough estrogen to be bad news for people with autoimmune disorders. I’m not allowed to eat soy – it triggers flares.

Leave a Reply