14 responses to “Dept of Pure Evil: Genentech says “no substitutions””

  1. firepower

    No socialized medicine but through big pharm.

    No transportation infrastructure but through taxpayer-bailed airlines.

    No Marshall Plan for Iraq but through no-bid private contracts.

    It’s at these points that I really get into regionalism, that I really get into decentralization of government. What rapine couldn’t my sovereign government indulge if it were actually personally responsible to me.

    I’m voting Republican in the legislative elections. Why? Because my reps’ biggest contributors are student loan companies. By the way, no socialized education but through taxpayer-floated Sallie Maes.

    It fucking infuriates me.

  2. firepower

    No socialized medicine but through big pharm.

    No transportation infrastructure but through taxpayer-bailed airlines.

    No Marshall Plan for Iraq but through no-bid private contracts.

    It’s at these points that I really get into regionalism, that I really get into decentralization of government. What rapine couldn’t my sovereign government indulge if it were actually personally responsible to me.

    I’m voting Republican in the legislative elections. Why? Because my reps’ biggest contributors are student loan companies. By the way, no socialized education but through taxpayer-floated Sallie Maes.

    It fucking infuriates me.

  3. kineticfactory

    I once heard that the drug companies spend a lot of money buying out and shutting down anyone likely to develop a cure for cancer (as opposed to an expensive treatment), because that would threaten their profit model (i.e., ransoming patients’ lives back to them by the month).

  4. kineticfactory

    I once heard that the drug companies spend a lot of money buying out and shutting down anyone likely to develop a cure for cancer (as opposed to an expensive treatment), because that would threaten their profit model (i.e., ransoming patients’ lives back to them by the month).

  5. la_lisa

    Cancer “cures”

    “chemically” similar doesn’t mean they are the same thing, shifting a molecule from L to D can make a significant difference, and the carrier agent could could make a difference as well in the drug’s safety and performance.

    FILL DISCLOSURE: I date a cancer researcher who works for a non-profit. His work in basic research is now being adapted into then drug pipeline with the potential to develop 12 new drugs, out of which maybe two will actually make it FDA approval in seven or eight years.

    Look at the signifcant strides made in cancer treatment over the past two decades, you’ll see great advances in survival rates. Since there are many types of cancer, there is no one “cure.” Cancer is part nature and part nurture, some are more environmentally charges, others genetically. The suble mechanisms of the immune systems, both innate and aptive are just beginning ot be understood thanks to inventions like spectrographs, DNA mapping, and son on. A drug that works on tumors isnt going to work on leukemia

    Researchers are developing vaccines that would stimulate an individual’s immune system based on the specific type of their cancer, and that cancer’s genetic make up, usigf he patient’s body to help fight the disease, rather than just shutting down all cell growth; this is a less toxic model which hopefully will see some progress soon-maybe wiht a decade. Currently chemotherapy works by interrupting the growth of all fast multiplying cells–be they cancer, skin, hair nails or stomach lining. The newer forms of these drugs are far more effective at targeting and do not cause the overwhelming trauma previously seen.

    Before starting to get worried about Big Pharma shutting down cancer research, take a good look at our current funding for National Institutes of Health which has been brutally slashed–less than TWO PERCENT of research grants proposed make it to the funding stage. I wonder where “anyone likely to develop a cure for cancer” is getting the millions and millions of dollars to do their work, in that a “simple” pipette for measure liquids costs a thousand dollars. To run a reasonably sized research facility costs millions and millions of dollars a year.

    Money spent on cancer research, especially within the immune system sector, has wide ranging repercussions for diseases like HIV, psoriatic arthritis (which is treated with a form of chemotherapy developed for cancer), MS, Parkinsons, and so on.

    Yes, wheat grass enemas and organic foods have their place. So does aspirin as a preventative for colon cancer.My mom had esophageal cancer and declined treatment and lived as long as she would have with treatment. She was an exception, but the majority of other friends and family who had cancer would not have lived as long as they did (7 years for my dad; 10 years for a friend who is still alive and kicking ass; who knows how long for one of my oldest friends who had nasal/brain sarcoma 9 years ago–she is still gloriously alive, the saved her face, though another woman in her treatment cycle lost her nose and a third died; one of my guy friends with prostae cancer who is being treated with care and dignity to preserve his very important sexuality, etc; yet my stepfather died in a month from aplastic anemia a kind of blood cancer less than two weeks after beng diagnosed–and he would have GLADLY paid the ransom to live another year)if we did not build on past research and the tens of millions of dollars spent by pharmaceutical companies who use both basic research and applied research.

    We have choices in our medical care, and

  6. la_lisa

    Cancer “cures”

    “chemically” similar doesn’t mean they are the same thing, shifting a molecule from L to D can make a significant difference, and the carrier agent could could make a difference as well in the drug’s safety and performance.

    FILL DISCLOSURE: I date a cancer researcher who works for a non-profit. His work in basic research is now being adapted into then drug pipeline with the potential to develop 12 new drugs, out of which maybe two will actually make it FDA approval in seven or eight years.

    Look at the signifcant strides made in cancer treatment over the past two decades, you’ll see great advances in survival rates. Since there are many types of cancer, there is no one “cure.” Cancer is part nature and part nurture, some are more environmentally charges, others genetically. The suble mechanisms of the immune systems, both innate and aptive are just beginning ot be understood thanks to inventions like spectrographs, DNA mapping, and son on. A drug that works on tumors isnt going to work on leukemia

    Researchers are developing vaccines that would stimulate an individual’s immune system based on the specific type of their cancer, and that cancer’s genetic make up, usigf he patient’s body to help fight the disease, rather than just shutting down all cell growth; this is a less toxic model which hopefully will see some progress soon-maybe wiht a decade. Currently chemotherapy works by interrupting the growth of all fast multiplying cells–be they cancer, skin, hair nails or stomach lining. The newer forms of these drugs are far more effective at targeting and do not cause the overwhelming trauma previously seen.

    Before starting to get worried about Big Pharma shutting down cancer research, take a good look at our current funding for National Institutes of Health which has been brutally slashed–less than TWO PERCENT of research grants proposed make it to the funding stage. I wonder where “anyone likely to develop a cure for cancer” is getting the millions and millions of dollars to do their work, in that a “simple” pipette for measure liquids costs a thousand dollars. To run a reasonably sized research facility costs millions and millions of dollars a year.

    Money spent on cancer research, especially within the immune system sector, has wide ranging repercussions for diseases like HIV, psoriatic arthritis (which is treated with a form of chemotherapy developed for cancer), MS, Parkinsons, and so on.

    Yes, wheat grass enemas and organic foods have their place. So does aspirin as a preventative for colon cancer.My mom had esophageal cancer and declined treatment and lived as long as she would have with treatment. She was an exception, but the majority of other friends and family who had cancer would not have lived as long as they did (7 years for my dad; 10 years for a friend who is still alive and kicking ass; who knows how long for one of my oldest friends who had nasal/brain sarcoma 9 years ago–she is still gloriously alive, the saved her face, though another woman in her treatment cycle lost her nose and a third died; one of my guy friends with prostae cancer who is being treated with care and dignity to preserve his very important sexuality, etc; yet my stepfather died in a month from aplastic anemia a kind of blood cancer less than two weeks after beng diagnosed–and he would have GLADLY paid the ransom to live another year)if we did not build on past research and the tens of millions of dollars spent by pharmaceutical companies who use both basic research and applied research.

    We have choices in our medical care, and

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